Randox Teoranta announce fourth year of WAAR sponsorship

Randox Teoranta announce fourth year of WAAR sponsorship

Randox are proud to announce that Randox Teoranta, for the fourth year running, is the main sponsor for WAAR 2018, an event which places mental wellbeing at its core. Launched at the weekend, on Friday 23rd February 2018, this year’s Wild Atlantic Adventure Race promises to deliver an incredible display of stamina, strength and perseverance as outdoor pursuit enthusiasts once again brave the elements to complete the demanding 55.5km course or 39km sprint.

The full Wild Atlantic Adventure Race (WAAR) features a 10km run, 42.5km cycle, 2km hike and 1km kayak, starting and finishing at CLG Naomh Muire, The Banks, Mullaghderg, Co. Donegal on Saturday 12th May 2018. Set along one of the most beautiful natural coastlines in the world, the west coast will once again play host to one of the most challenging yet enjoyable races, featuring both novice and elite individuals, as well as several relay teams.

This year, fundraising efforts will be donated to CLG Naomh Muire. Launching the event was best-selling author and TV personality Majella O’Donnell who overcame breast cancer in 2013.

Hailing from Co. Tipperary and married to Irish country music legend Daniel O’Donnell, Majella became iconic in her own right when she shaved her head live on The Late Late Show in 2013, raising €600,000 for The Irish Cancer Society. Majella also documented her life story in her book ‘It’s All in the Head.’ The book’s moving tale quickly became a number one Irish best-seller and 2014 Irish Book Award-winner.

Majella’s own force of character and deep-seated determination makes her a worthy representative to launch WAAR 2018, an endurance race that will test the physical and mental stamina of participants to their limits.

Dr. Ciaran Richardson, Head of Research & Development at Randox Teoranta in Dungloe, said:

“We are delighted to, once again, partner with WAAR. The event is a real test of physical wellbeing and here at Randox, we take our on-going work to promote positive physical and mental health very seriously. In the last few years, our labs in Dungloe have led the way in world-leading diagnostic research in a wide range of areas including Alzheimer’s disease, kidney disease, cancer, gastrointestinal disorders and stroke.

The WAAR launch was a great success and we look forward to the exciting event in May. We encourage as many people as possible to get involved as it’s sure to be another thrilling event for both entrants and spectators alike.”

For further information please contact the Randox PR Team: phone 028 9442 2413 or email randoxpr@randox.com 

 

 


Ulster GAA team embark on Randox-sponsored tour of China

Ulster University’s GAA team departs on a historic two week tour of China this weekend as part of the university’s wider programme of engagement in key international markets, sponsored by Randox.

Following a reception with the Lord Mayor of Belfast earlier in the week, the 25-strong team will leave Belfast on Saturday morning for the two week cultural exchange that aims to develop and enhance links with a number of Chinese academic institutions.

The trip is being sponsored by Randox and facilitated by the university’s Confucius Institute.

The team is spending a week in Beijing before heading to Wuhan and Huangshi City to play several games as part of an extensive tour promoting sporting excellence at Ulster University, in particular Gaelic Games.

Professor Ian Montgomery, Pro-Vice Chancellor of Ulster University, said:

“Gaelic games are of increasing interest to the Chinese people and there is a strong appetite to learn about the various sports, and replicate key tactics and the strong cultural identity which Ulster University’s GAA team has developed over many decades.”

“We’ll be playing several GAA teams, including a talented Beijing team, and sharing knowledge with the coaches on how to improve the players’ game and training regimes. When we get to Wuhan and Huangshi City, we’ll be taking Chinese language classes, learning martial arts and trying our hand at authentic Chinese cooking.” 

For many of the students, this is a once in a lifetime opportunity to travel across the world to an important global market. As well as promoting sporting excellence and acting as ambassadors for the University and Northern Ireland, they will be instrumental in helping the University and Randox build stronger relationships with new and existing partners.

Dr Peter FitzGerald, founder of Randox, said:

“We are pleased to support Ulster University’s Gaelic team as they embark on a very exciting tour of China. It is one of our most important markets, as we have been exporting to China since 1992 and we have had an established presence in the region for several years. This is a brilliant opportunity for our partnership with Ulster University to profile some of the young sporting talents of Northern Ireland and to strengthen key business relationships in an important market.”

For further information about the Randox-sponsored GAA tour, please contact Randox PR by phoning 028 9445 1016 or emailing RandoxPR@randox.com


Ulster GAA team sponsored by Randox bringing sporting excellence to China

Ulster University’s GAA team is preparing to travel to China on an historic tour of the country as part of the university’s wider programme of engagement in key international markets.

The trip, which will be sponsored by Crumlin-based diagnostics firm Randox, will see a 35 strong team depart on 28 October for a two week cultural exchange that aims to develop and enhance links with a number of Chinese academic institutions.

The team will travel to Beijing, Wuhan, and Huangshi City and play several games as part of an extensive tour promoting sporting excellence at Ulster University and Gaelic Games in particular.

Professor Ian Montgomery, Pro-Vice Chancellor, Global Engagement at Ulster University said:

“GAA is of increasing interest to the Chinese people and there is a strong appetite to learn about the various sports, key tactics and the strong cultural identity which Ulster University’s GAA team has developed over many decades. This tour, supported by Randox, will give our team the opportunity to showcase Gaelic football and hurling to a vast audience which is interested to learn more and experience a game first-hand through a number of Gaelic Games masterclasses.”

“As an internationally focused university it is important to continually build new partnerships in this vast market and further enhance existing linkages. From research collaborations with some of China’s top universities to our role as home to the Confucius Institute and Confucius classrooms initiative in Northern Ireland, China remains a significant market with clear potential for growth. We look forward to building on our work in this region and meeting new connections as part of the tour.”

Dr Peter FitzGerald, founder of Randox, said:

“We are pleased to support Ulster University’s Gaelic team as they embark on a very exciting tour of China. It is one of our most important markets, as we have been exporting to China since 1992 and we have had an established presence in the region for several years. This is a brilliant opportunity for our partnership with Ulster University to profile some of the young sporting talents of Northern Ireland and to strengthen key business relationships in an important market.”

For further information about the Randox-sponsored GAA tour, please contact Randox PR by phoning 028 9445 1016 or emailing RandoxPR@randox.com


Randox Polo Tournament returns to Bushmills

Hot off the heels of its first ever Randox Health Grand National, global healthcare company Randox returned this weekend to Bushmills to again host its International Polo Tournament. Renowned polo players from across the world joined the founder of the Co Antrim-based firm, Dr Peter FitzGerald, to play in the coastal town.

Following a successful event last year, which was the first of its kind held in Northern Ireland, the 2017 Randox Polo hosted almost 450 guests, including Lord-Lieutenant of County Antrim, Mrs. Joan Christie OBE, and Mayor of the Causeway Coast and Glens Borough Council, Joan Baird, who delivered the match ball of the first polo game. Former Miss Northern Ireland and fitness blogger Tiffany Brien, added a touch of glamour to the event.

On display was the company’s latest venture – the Randox Health Mobile Clinic. The unveiling of the bespoke Mercedez-Benz vehicle marks a departure from traditional models of healthcare provision, as the company’s advanced health screening programmes are now available to people anywhere in the country, using its travelling team of trained scientists and phlebotomists.

It was a victory for the Randox team in their first game of the tournament, as they went head-to-head with Scotland, but it was the Republic of Ireland team who emerged winners of the International Polo Tournament when they scored more goals than Team Randox in the final match of the day.

Randox, a recognised supporter of the arts, launched the weekend with a performance from Camerata Ireland Cameratino, an ensemble composed of  acclaimed Irish flautist Eimear McGeown, and a String Trio including Violinist Sarah Sew, Violist Nathan Sherman and Celloist Gerald Peregrine, in Dundarave Estate.

The musical element continued on Saturday with a Beating of the Retreat by the Royal Irish Regimental Band, including the highly popular “Highland Cathedral,” and a unique version of “Run” by Snow Patrol.

Local Bushmills residents weren’t put off by the wet conditions, and turned out to watch both the polo tournament, and the fireworks display which rounded off the event.

Randox Founder and Managing Director, Dr. Peter FitzGerald, a keen horseman who played in the polo tournament, commented;

“Given that our inaugural tournament in 2016 received such positive feedback from the Bushmills community, we are delighted to have been able to once again bring the event to the beautiful North Coast and its residents, and to bring the Randox Health message to our Polo guests.  By prioritising your health and wellbeing you can make the most of life’s special moments and occasions – like this great polo tournament.

“We’re very lucky that the resilient spirits of the local Bushmills community weren’t dampened by the rain, and everyone was able to enjoy a wonderful afternoon together on the beautiful north coast.”

For more information about the Randox Polo Tournament in Bushmills contact the Randox PR team: Call 028 9442 2413 or email randoxpr@randox.com


Grand National sponsor Randox hosts polo event in Scotland

Returning to the home of 2017 Randox Health Grand National winner One For Arthur, the sponsor of the world’s greatest horse race is hosting an international polo tournament in the heart of Scotland this weekend.

Not only is Scotland known for some of the biggest names in horse racing but the country, which was this week voted by tourists as the most beautiful country in the world, also hosts an impressive polo scene – Randox has been hosting international polo tournaments there for over 15 years. This year the global healthcare company is hosting internationally renowned polo players from countries including Argentina and South Africa at Errol Park in Perthshire, where teams will play in front of hundreds of spectators.

In celebration of Scotland’s rich equestrian heritage and talent, guests of honour at this year’s Randox Polo will include the winning trainer from this year’s Randox Health Grand National, Lucinda Russell, and ‘Golf Widow’ Belinda McClung.

Randox Founder and Managing Director, Dr. Peter FitzGerald, who is himself taking part in the Randox Polo Tournament, commented;

“There are few sports that come close to the speed of the action and the thrill of the chase in a competitive polo match, but there is one that springs to mind.  Winning the Randox Health Grand National, the world’s most famous horse race, is achieved by only the very best in this field, and I am delighted that five months after I handed over the trophy, the winning trainer and owner, Lucinda Russell and Belinda McClung, are joining us in Perthshire at our international polo tournament.  It is through events like these that we are able to share our Randox Health message with the public, and by taking care of our health we are able to make the most of life’s special moments and occasions.”

Unveiled at this weekend’s Randox Polo tournament will be the health firm’s first Mobile Health Clinic, designed to meet the increasing demand for the healthcare service which has stemmed from the sponsorship of the Randox Health Grand National, and to make the world’s most advanced and personalised health check accessible to all.

Dr. FitzGerald continued;

“Our new mobile services marks a departure from traditional models of healthcare provision and is in line with our passion for innovation.  We’re delighted to be able to offer guests to our polo event our unique Randox Health technology, so that anyone who wants to take their health into their own hands, can do so.”

Please contact Randox PR for more information: Call 028 9442 2413 or email randoxpr@randox.com


We Are Randox | Jonathan Acheson, Physiotherapist to the stars

It’s not every day you get to meet a celebrity.  Whether it’s an actor, comedian, model or sporting legend, we all secretly hope that the time will come when we can get to meet our idols!

But what if you were able to work, travel and play alongside your role models every week?

That’s exactly what our Randox Health Corporate Relations Manager, Jonny Acheson does.

Jonny has worked with some of the biggest names in the Northern Irish sporting industry – providing physiotherapy and sports massages to rugby players including Stephen Ferris and Ruan Pienaar!

Read Jonny’s story below.

I went to school at Belfast Royal Academy and played rugby all through my teens. Then I went on to study Physiotherapy at the University of Ulster in Jordanstown, from which I graduated in 2012.

I had a part time job in B&Q during university and so worked my way up in there whilst studying for my degree, all the while playing rugby for my university of course!

It seemed like a natural progression to work my way through the B&Q ranks while I was there, and so when I qualified, I got promoted to Project Manager for B&Q Ireland, working from our Dublin office. It was a fantastic experience to be able to develop my people management skills, but working in the health industry was really where I wanted to be, because physiotherapy and rugby were my passion.

I was therefore delighted to have been offered the opportunity to meet the head of 352 Healthcare, to become the outpatient physiotherapist for the 352 Group. I was responsible for setting up and running the outpatient physio department – a job which I did for 2 years whilst also doing other part time physio work in sports.

For some time I worked with Ulster Rugby as a sports massage therapist, after having volunteered one afternoon a week for a couple of months. That summer I got to go away on their pre-season trip to Bayonne in south France for the week. 

There’s one story from that trip that I will always remember.  After the game against Bayonne, the players, coaches and I were all walking down from the changing rooms to the players’ lounge for a meal and a load of fans had waited behind to get autographs.

 I was walking behind Stephen Ferris and Ruan Pienaar and they started signing autographs for their fans.  All of a sudden one supporter was asking me to sign his flag, thinking that I was one of the Ulster rugby players.

I had a moment’s pause while I tried to pull together in my head an explanation in French that I didn’t actually play for the team!

After deciding that my French wasn’t good enough to explain this I thought that it might just be easier to sign… so there were about 20 french fans who thought they were getting all the Ulster rugby stars names, but actually ended up with the lesser-known Jonny Acheson scrawled across their Bayonne flags! I did however write my name in my best and neatest handwriting.

I was also the physio for the Irish Deaf Football Team in the Deaf European Championships in Hannover in Germany, and in the Deaf Olympics in Sofia in Bulgaria, and for the Ulster Deaf Football Team.

I learnt a lot from my dual role in 352 Healthcare and sports physiotherapy, but most importantly that I wanted to be able to bring my sports and health background to a sales and business development position. Therefore the position of Corporate Relations Manager at Randox Health seemed like the perfect fit.

Having an understating of anatomy and the physiology of the body is invaluable when explaining our health programmes to clients. My physio background has also opened several doors that have allowed me to continually grow my contact network.

I continue to do physiotherapy for Randalstown Rugby Club part time, in addition to my role here at Randox. I also play for the Randox Rugby team.

I’ve been asked by a few other local teams to come back and play for them again next season, but I’m still undecided.  Unfortunately I had 5 fractures and a ruptured ligament from a rugby injury a few years back which restricted my playing.  I had 2 plates and several screws inserted to try and fix the breaks and rupture, but when I had these taken out a year later, I was left with part of a screw that had broken off and was too difficult to remove!

So it might be quite some time before I’m back to playing full time. If only I knew a sports physiotherapist…

We are committed to improving healthcare worldwide and every member of our team plays an integral role in helping us to realise our vision.  We are therefore very lucky that Jonny has brought his experience and anatomical expertise to his role in Randox Health. 

If you’re interested in joining our growing team of talented and enthusiastic professionals, please contact recruitment@randox.com

For more information about the #WeAreRandox initiative please contact Randox PR by email: randoxpr@randox.com or phone 028 9442 2413


We Are Randox | James Crilly’s adventures in Zambia

This week our WeAreRandox feature is a story from James Crilly, one of our QC Marketing Executives. Before James came to work in Randox he travelled to Misisi  as part of Project Zambia. James took some time out to reflect on his Zambian adventure and tell us a little bit about what he got up to. 

“Back when I attended St Mary’s Grammar school in Belfast I applied to take part in Project Zambia. It’s a Belfast based registered charity that first started up in 2002 by Dr Donaldson from St Marys CBGS Belfast. The aim of project Zambia is to help support and empower host communities to develop solutions to their problems and difficulties.

“Dr Donaldson had been my RE teacher and had always entertained during lessons with videos, pictures and old stories of Zambia. So when I finally reached Upper Sixth and had the opportunity to apply to take part in Project Zambia I jumped at it. We were told at the time that those with the best AS results would be given first priority.  The next day at assembly they called out the names of the 13 students who had been chosen and thankfully I made the cut. We teamed up with thirteen other students from St Dominic’s Girls’ School and started to prepare for our journey together that Easter.

“As part of the process we each had to raise £1500 that would go towards our flights, hostels, food and equipment. One of the first ideas I had was to complete a 10K run at Shaw’s bridge. However on the day of the run there was snow! I decided I would go ahead with the fundraiser despite the weather and turned the 10K run into a 10K walk. I organised church talks in my local parish where I spoke to the local community about Project Zambia. There was a lot of interest and I managed to raise £2500 which I put straight into my ‘Zambia Funds’ piggybank.  One lady who came up to me after the mass donated £500 which was amazing. I also did a 24 hour fast and my old primary school ‘Holy Trinity’ hosted a non-uniform day which raised £450.

“I remember being surprised when we touched down in Zambia airport to see how developed it was. When you think about Zambia the first thing that comes to mind is poverty but the airport was quite surprising. It wasn’t like Heathrow airport but there were a couple of shops, you could get a coffee and they had different terminals. It was worlds apart from where we were going to be.

“When we arrived in Lusaka, Zambia one of the first places we went was called Misisi. This was a slum that could be found right along a railway track. Misisi has been identified as one of the five worst slums in Sub-Saharan Africa so it isn’t hard to imagine the horrific scenes we encountered here. I can honestly say it’s probably one of the worst places I have ever seen with sewage, rubbish and urine everywhere. But right in the middle of it is a little school called St Catherine’s which housed all the children from the Misisi area. The school was literally just a couple of small buildings and right around the buildings was a stone wall with a huge cast iron gate. When we asked why such a rundown area would go to such measures we were told it was built to stop men from getting in and kidnapping the children for prostitution.

“Finding this out really shocked us and we decided to help the school appear more child friendly and welcoming for the children. We painted all the classrooms, hung up numbers pictures and those who were artistic drew images of Disney characters on the classroom walls. We also built a toilet because if the children needed to go to the bathroom they had to go out the back and into a small brick shelter that had a small little bucket. Once they had finished they had to throw the content in the bucket down a hole which ran out into the compound adding to the horrific smell and unsanitary conditions.

“Another place that we visited was ‘The Home of Hope’ which was just outside Misisi and was made up of two large metal containers and run by a priest called Brother Isaac. It housed boys who were anything between 6 months old to 18 years old and there were about 40 children in total there.  There was one classroom and one bedroom which had six bunk beds in it. You got about two children to each bunk and the rest had to sleep on the floor. As you can imagine there was rivalry between the children to see who got to sleep in the bunk beds and usually the older children over-ruled the younger children.

“While there we helped put the finishing touches to the roof of the school they were building and cleaned up the surrounding area. It was overrun with weeds and high grass which wasn’t really safe for the children. We wanted them to be able to play safely on the grounds and if they fell and hurt themselves they wouldn’t have access to any medical supplies. I was here for about four days and really got the opportunity to interact with all the kids. They were interested in sports and loved playing football with us. So one afternoon we went into the nearest shopping centre and bought them basketball hoops, footballs, football nets, basketball nets board games, chalks and pencils which they loved.

“Another memory I have of being there was attending the funeral of the son of Peter Tembo, co-founder of Project Zambia. There were 100s and 100s of Zambian people there and only about 20 of us from the school. They called us ‘Mazungus’ which means white person. It might seem strange to say it was a privilege to attend the funeral but this was very much unheard of in Zambia. White people didn’t get asked to come along to local funerals which shows the high regard that they had for Project Zambia and its volunteers. The white people who live in Zambia live behind guarded 15 foot high walls and razor sharp barbed wire. They have golf courses and swimming pools and live in a completely different world from the local Zambian people. The locals would have never have seen the light of day in their territory.  You would know who had money and who didn’t even among the Zambians by whether or not they had hair. A lot of people had shaved heads due to head lice and had no shoes and dirty rags on their back.

“One of the last places I went to was Kabwata Orphanage which was run by two nuns. Here there were about 70 children who had either been abandoned by their family or had none. We did a bit of DIY work which involved putting up bunkbeds, chests of drawers and paintings. Here I had the pleasure of meeting one little guy called Mosses who came to Kabwata Orphanage when he was only one years old. He had been abandoned and left on the roadside in a moses basket and that’s how he got his name. He’s now sixteen and doing really well in school. He has high aspirations for the future and possibly could be become a teacher which is a career that is looked upon highly in Zambia.

“On Easter Saturday before we left we stayed in a hostel and about half a mile away, there was a large church. One day we decided to go and check it out and as we were walking up to it you could hear music and people singing. Once we turned the corner of the church I saw a sea of thousands of Zambians: there were men beating on drums and women dressed in their Sunday best, waving palms and dancing and singing, creating waves of colour below me. It was sight I will never forget. These people had literally nothing but yet were so happy and welcoming to us. We got to join in on the celebration which was amazing and I would honestly go back tomorrow if I got the chance.

“My little brother Owen is going over on 27th June for ten days so I decided to help him out by doing a bun sale in Randox. I was up till midnight the night before baking and we raised £243.89 which was great. He’s also going to be doing a 10K run at Black Mountain and a non-uniform day in his old primary school. I had saved about £200 from when I went to Zambia because I knew one day he would go himself. I kept it in a little red container and my mum hid it in her room so no-one could get to it.  He said he might shave his head but that depends on how well the rest of the fundraising goes! I’ll make sure to keep you updated on that one.”

For more information about fundraising at Randox please contact randoxpr@randox.com


We Are Randox | Randox Runners raise money for The Alzheimer’s Society in the Belfast City Marathon

Yesterday we had two Randox teams compete in the Belfast City Marathon, in aid of the Alzheimer’s Society.

Suzanne Smillie, Fintan Geoghegan, Ciaran Orchin, Ashleigh McKinstry and Rebecca Molloy made up The Incredible Immunoglobins team. They finished in a fantastic time of 4:23:45, in 1074th position.

Katie Lawther, Maeve McAllister, Michael Thompson, Chloe Carlin and Mark Spence ran as The Marvellous Monoclonals and finished in an impressive 4:02:28, which put them into 560th position.

We are delighted to announce that so far both teams have collectively raised a fabulous £566.64 for The Alzheimer’s Society, with donations continuing to flood in!

A huge congratulations to both teams for taking on this amazing challenge and for raising so much money for such a worthwhile cause.

 

Upon completing the marathon, Team Captain of the Marvellous Monoclonals, Katie Lawther told us;

“The race was fantastic, the hot weather made it tough going but it was much better than rain!  The atmosphere was electric in the whole city with the streets lined with people cheering every runner on. 

“During the first 3 legs the two teams ran together, and then within the last two legs my team clinched the victory! On the day though we were just glad everyone finished and ran so well, it felt like everyone had won so that was an amazing feeling. There were also a few other people running for Alzheimer’s Society which was great to see.

“After the race we all met at the finish line to collect our medals, and then we all headed to eat lunch in Stranmillis along the river which was really lovely. An amazing part of my day was seeing Laura Graham coming over the finish line, she is the first Northern Irish winner in 18 years!”

 

The Incredible Immunoglobulins Team Captain, Suzanne Smillie, commented;

“None of us can believe how lucky we were with the weather – though there are a few burnt scientists around the Firfields site today, myself included!

“The race went very well (aside from a little changeover confusion at the start of Leg 4 for The Incredible Immunoglobulins – Fintan and I could not find each other which lead to a separation between the two teams who, until that point, were neck and neck). The Marvellous Monoclonals won the battle completing the 26.2 mile course in just over four hours.

“I would like to say a big thank you for everybody’s support at Randox, and for your donations.  It is very much appreciated.”

 

If you would still like to donate to our Marathon Runner’s Just Giving page you can do so by clicking on the link below:

https://www.justgiving.com/fundraising/TheMarvellousMonoclonalsandTheIncredibleImmunoglobulins

Thank you for your generosity.


We Are Randox | The Marvellous Monoclonals and The Incredible Immunoglobulins go head-to-head in the Belfast City Marathon in aid of the Alzheimer’s Society

Muhammad Ali and Joe Frazier.

Roger Federer and Rafael Nadal.

Liverpool and Everton.

Sport has produced some of history’s greatest rivalries.

But none of them will compare to Monday 1st May 2017 when Randox rivals The Marvellous Monoclonals, and The Incredible Immunoglobins go head-to-head during the much-anticipated, 42km-long Belfast City Marathon, to raise funds for The Alzheimer’s Society.

We chatted to the two team captains ahead of the big race to hear what they think about their chances of victory.

Suzanne Smillie, Team Captain, The Incredible Immunoglobins

What made you decide to pull together a team to run The Belfast Marathon?

Suzanne: We all work in the Biotechnology department but across three separate teams – Monoclonal Development, Monoclonal Production and the Polyclonal team.  So although we all work in the same division of the company we don’t all necessarily know each other. So I thought teaming up to do the Belfast Marathon together would be good way to get to know each other, to put some faces to names and to do a bit of team building.

Who’s in your team?

Suzanne: In my team I have myself, Fintan Geoghegan, Ciaran Orchin, Ashleigh McKinstry and Rebecca Molloy.

How did you decide which leg of the race each runner is going to do?

Suzanne: It was a bit of a negotiation really, just trying to figure out who wanted to do what!  I have actually run in the Belfast Marathon relay event before so I was happy to let those who hadn’t done it before pick first.

What training have you been doing in preparation for the race?

Suzanne: We each started at different stages and have each had a different experience during our training. Rebecca in my team had never run before at all but has really taken an interest in the past month.  I think she has a pretty addictive personality – she told me that she is now running 3 times a week with her boyfriend!  She must be enjoying it because she told me that she thinks she’s going to keep it up even after we complete the marathon.

Do any of you have any previous running or marathon experience?

Suzanne: Some of the boys do a bit of running in their spare time, and Ciaran is really sporty.  He plays GAA and is definitely the most athletic out of all of us. Chloe on Katie’s team also plays a lot of hockey.

What do you think will be the biggest challenge you will be faced with on Monday?

Suzanne: There’s rain and potential snow forecast for Monday! Rebecca says she’d rather have a bit of refreshing rain than too much heat but I’m just worried about having the wind beating against my face!  From running the marathon before I know that it’s really difficult to run against the wind.

Who is your team’s fastest runner?

Suzanne: Ciaran will be the fastest!

Who is the most competitive runner?

Suzanne: Without a doubt Fintan is the most competitive runner.  He’s running against Michael in the other team and they are good friends, working in the same lab, so they’ll be quite competitive running directly against each other.

Ashleigh and Mark will also be quite competitive when they run against each other in the last leg, the glory leg.  On Facebook Ashleigh wrote “Eat my dust!” to him!

Has there been anyone not pulling their weight and needs to up their training over the weekend?

Suzanne: I’m going to up my fundraising game over the weekend by hosting a fundraiser on Sunday night with my choir!

What makes you think you’re going to win?

Suzanne: We’re a shorter team so we’re more aerodynamic.

Have you been keeping track of the other team’s training regimes and progress?

Suzanne: Rebecca has been nominated as my official team spy and I have sent her out in her car to follow the other team when they’re running.

I myself have a very particular set of skills. I’m a champion Facebook creeper and have been following the other team’s updates and statuses to make sure they aren’t sneaking in a cheeky set of press-ups in the tearoom on their lunch breaks.

Any hiccups along the way?

Suzanne: Ciaran had a hamstring injury and Maeve got a clicky hip but thankfully nobody has suffered anything too serious!

What are you most looking forward to about the race?

Suzanne: Having done the marathon before I know that being there is just the most incredible experience.  The feeling of being part of something bigger than you is a wonderful feeling and it’s truly special to be one of the thousands of people who come together to do something for other people less fortunate than us.

Regardless of the weather we’ll know that we’re doing something for the benefit of others and that’s a great feeling.

Anyone you think might be a sore loser?

Suzanne: Fintan! We’re all in agreement on that one.  Possibly Ashleigh as well if Mark beats her during the last leg.

Any forfeits for the losing team?

Suzanne: Rebecca had a good idea that we could get the other team to calibrate our pipettes for a month if we win. Or that they have to take out our clinical waste for us.

But eventually we landed on them making us our lunch every day for a month.

Katie Lawther, Team Captain, The Marvellous Monoclonals

How did you pick who was going to be in your team?

Katie: It was a totally random draw! We put names in a hat and just made sure that the teams were equally weighted with two men and three women in each.

Who’s in your team?

Katie: There’s Maeve McAllister, Michael Thompson, Chloe Carlin, Mark Spence and myself.

How did you decide which leg of the race each runner is going to do?

Katie: Some people knew which leg they wanted to run and others didn’t mind.  In my team specifically, Maeve had taken part in the relay before and had run the first leg, so she wanted to do it again because she had enjoyed it the last time.  She enjoys being at the starting line!

How did you decide which charity to run for?

Katie: I asked everyone if they had any particular charities they were passionate about, because I’m very passionate about The Alzheimer’s Society myself.  My Granny, who helped to raise me alongside my mum, was diagnosed with it when I was younger and so I ended up helping to care for her with my mum and sister.

When I told people that I’d like us to run in aid of The Alzheimer’s Society it turned out that other people had personal experiences with it too.  Maeve’s friend’s father passed away from Alzheimer’s when was he quite young and so she likes to fundraise for it when she can.

I think everyone has been affected by it in some form or another so we were all in agreement that it was the charity to go for.

We’re also actively involved in research and development into Alzheimer’s disease here in the Randox Biotechnology team so it just felt like the perfect fit.

What training have you been doing in preparation for the race?

Katie: We’ve each trained according to our own needs and schedules.  Michael in my team has been training for months because he wouldn’t be a natural runner yet he has one of the longest legs of the race.  Personally I’ve been swimming a couple of times a week to improve my fitness.

Do you think your teamwork in the lab will help you work as a team during the marathon?

Katie: Maeve and I are best friends in work so I’m really going to enjoy the moment Maeve passes the baton over to me.  When I see her coming I’m going to be cheering her on!

Do any of you have any previous running or marathon experience?

Katie: Ciaran is the sportiest out of all of us but unfortunately he’s on the other team! I imagine he will be Suzanne’s secret weapon…

Who is your team’s fastest runner?

Katie: Definitely Maeve! She’s going to do it for the girls.

Who is the most competitive runner?

Katie: In my team Mark is pretty competitive, and certainly has been with regards to fundraising. He’s on Facebook every single night promoting our team and bringing in the donations. He wants to have raised the most money!

Has there been anyone not pulling their weight and therefore needs to up their training over the weekend?

Katie: Maeve and I are going to have one final push on our training over the weekend.  Between the two of us we make up the Organising Committee for the teams and so we’ve spent quite a lot of time fussing and arranging rather than training!

What makes you think you’re going to win?

Katie: Suzanne seems to think our team is taller than hers and we are therefore less aerodynamic. Personally it’s the first time I’ve ever been called tall so I’ll take it!

Our long giraffe-like limbs will help us win.

Any sabotage going on?

Katie: Ciaran brought in a 5KG bag of M&Ms a few days ago and strategically left them on the desk I share with Maeve. He’s been trying to fatten us up!

Maeve naively thought that he was trying to give us a nice energy boost but I saw the sabotage for what it really was.

What are you most looking forward to about the race?

Katie: I know I speak on behalf of everyone in my team when I say that we’re all looking forward to meeting up at the finishing line, watching Mark and Ashleigh finish the final leg, cheering them on and finishing the marathon together as a team.

I’m also looking forward to seeing our fundraising total after all the hard work we’ve done.  We’ll do an official handover to the Alzheimer’s Society with the help of the Randox Internal Communications team.

It will be such a special moment handing over our well-earned funds to such a worthwhile cause.

Any forfeits for the losing team?

Katie: We want to do a lab swap like when Monica and Rachel swap apartments with Joey and Chandler!

Any celebration plans for when the race is over?

Katie: We’re all going to go to Cutter’s Wharf for a celebratory meal together. We’re all very much looking forward to it.

Our two marathon teams will join 17,500 runners taking part in the race on Bank Holiday Monday and will together be raising funds for the very worthy Alzheimer’s society, the only UK charity investing in research into dementia care, cause, cure and prevention.

In 2015/16, for every £1 received by The Alzheimer’s Society, 89p was directly spent on improving the lives of people with dementia. The other 11p goes towards generating future income.

We’re very proud that our marathon runners are taking on this incredible challenge in the name of such an amazing charity and wish them all the very best.

It doesn’t matter who finishes first in the race, you are all winners in our eyes! Good luck!

To donate to our Marathon Teams’ fundraising efforts please click the link below to visit their Just Giving Fundraising page: https://www.justgiving.com/fundraising/TheMarvellousMonoclonalsandTheIncredibleImmunoglobulins

For more information about fundraising at Randox please contact randoxpr@randox.com

Our Marathon Runners left to right are: Fintan Geoghegan, Katie Lawther, Maeve McAllister, Ciaran Orchin, Chloe Carlin, Suzanne Smillie, Michael Thompson, Ashleigh McKinstry, Mark Spence and Rebecca Molloy

Ready, Set, Go: Randox Teoranta sponsors WAAR three years in a row

On Saturday 25th February, Ireland’s most famous adventurer, Jason Black, launched this year’s WAAR event, which is being sponsored for the third time by Randox Teoranta.  The Wild Atlantic Adventure Race which takes place in the Banks, Mullaghdearg, Donegal, raises much needed funds for the ongoing developments at CLG Naomh Mhuire.

World renowned adventurer, Jason Black commented;

“The Wild Atlantic Adventure Race is a brilliant event – an incredible physical challenge in a stunning location. I’m delighted to be involved, and encourage people to become active and set themselves goals. Whether it be climbing Mount Everest or powering through the WAAR, there’s a personal satisfaction that you get from sport that is so unique. That people not just from Ireland but overseas take part as well says all you need to know about the quality of this adventure race.”

With an anticipated 500 plus competitors hoping to take part this year on the 13th May, the race will include a 42.5k cycle, a 2K hike, and a 1K kayak. Adding an extra challenge, this year’s run has been increased by 2.5K to 10K offering contenders a day packed full of activities.

Ciaran Richardson, Head of R&D at Randox Teoranta in Dungloe, who is looking forward to supporting the event for a third time said;

We are delighted to sponsor the WAAR for a third consecutive year. The whole Donegal community looks forward to it and it’s a significant event promoting the importance of health, fitness and wellbeing. As a global diagnostics company we aim to revolutionise healthcare and WAAR gives us the perfect opportunity to spread our message of preventive health. We are looking forward to the event which is set to be a great success and hopefully we’ll be cheering on some of our own employees at the starting line again this year. “

WAAR committee member, Gavin Ó Dónaill, thanked Randox for their support and commented;

We are thrilled that Randox Teoranta have been named the 2017 sponsors of WAAR.  Without their sponsorship the event would not be possible. This year is set to be the biggest and best yet with an anticipated 500 plus competitors taking part. We have extended the distance of the run to 10K so there will be an added pressure to reach the finish line. We have also introduced a shorter sprint 39K Category to allow more newcomers to participate in WAAR. 

At the launch we will also be interviewing local members of the community who have in recent years become more involved in fitness and exercise through walking, running and cycling and have now registered to take part in the event. This represents the true spirit of WAAR.”

Saturday’s event will also include a new element in the form of a nutritional workshop by husband and wife, Jenna Maltese and Tom Coleman, the founders of My Nutrition Ireland who will offer simple effective food guidance to all attendees on the day.

For more information about the WAAR please contact Randox PR on 028 9445 1016 or email RandoxPR@randox.com


Clinical Laboratory Survey