Randox Health Grand National Family Fun Day launched at The Cope

Randox Health Grand National Family Fun Day launched at The Cope

RTÉ Raidió na Gaeltachta show Barrscéalta, together with Randox Health, would like to invite the public to join them for a special live show from The Cope in Dungloe at 11 am on Friday 16th February, to launch the upcoming Randox Health Grand National Family Fun Day.

To celebrate their sponsorship of the Grand National, Randox Health has offered Barrscéalta a superb prize of a trip for two to the event, to include flights and accommodation, and entry to the Randox Health Grand National.  Listeners can enter the competition by text in the week running up to the show from Dungloe – tune in to RnaG for full details – and all those who turn up for the live programme can also enter on the day to be in with a chance to win.  The winner will be drawn during the show.

Dr Peter FitzGerald, Randox Managing Director, commented;

“We are delighted to offer this prize to one lucky listener, in recognition of the consistent support Randox Teoranta has received from the local community since our establishment in Donegal in 2008.”

 “Our aim to offer world-leading science, engineering and software careers in west Donegal, so that people working in these fields no longer have to move away from home to find work, has been incredibly well-received. We’re therefore delighted that we’ll have representatives from Dungloe join us at the Randox Health Grand National as we celebrate together how far we have come.”

On Friday 16th February, there will also be lots of spot prizes for members of the audience, and plenty of tea, coffee and traybakes, supplied by The Cope.  The brand new Randox Health Grand National trophy, which will be unveiled to the public for the first time on 13th February at the prestigious Weights Event in London, will be on display during the programme. The new trophy, designed and created by renowned Liverpool silversmith Shannon O’Neill, stands 45 cm high and is made of solid silver gilded with gold.

Speaking of the trophy, Dr FitzGerald said;

“There is no other race in the world like the Randox Health Grand National, and we want to ensure that the trophy reflects the status of the achievement.”

The Randox Health Grand National Family Day will take place in Randox Teoranta, Meenmore, on the 14th April from 1 pm – 6 pm.  It’s a free event for all the family, with plenty of entertainment for kids, including a bouncy castle, as well as food and drink, live music and dance, craft stalls and a large screen for the public to watch the big races over at Aintree.  RTÉ Raidió na Gaeltachta’s sports programme Spórt an tSathairn, presented by Seán Bán Breathnach, will be broadcasting live from the event on 14th April.

Áine Ní Churráin will present this special edition of Barrscéalta on RTÉ Raidió na Gaeltachta live from The Cope on Friday 16th February.  All are welcome to attend the event which will take place between 11 am and 12 pm. There is no need to book.

For further information please contact the Randox PR Team: phone 028 9442 2413 or email randoxpr@randox.com 

 

Photography credit The Goldsmiths Company Assay Office.


We Are Randox | Parkinson’s disease documentary leads to Film Festival Award for R&D Scientist Carol Naughton

Behind the doors of Randox, ground breaking scientific research is happening.

From Alzheimer’s disease to gastro-intestinal disorders, bladder cancer to cardiovascular disease, diabetes to kidney injury, our team of R&D scientists work on pioneering research projects in the areas of health that matter most, and ultimately, they save lives.

This week, we spoke to Carol Naughton, R&D Scientist in our Randox Teoranta team in Donegal, who has recently been part of an award-winning film documentary which aims to let people into the minds, the labs and the projects of scientists working on pioneering health research like that which takes place in Randox.

The film project, called ‘Feats of Modest Valour’, focuses on the lives of three individuals with Parkinson’s disease, Brian, Tom and Milena, and on a team of scientists working to find a cure for the condition. Aiming to bridge the gap between scientists and the very people the research will have the most impact on, Carol explains how working with Parkinson’s disease sufferers was the most humbling experience of her life.

Here’s Carol’s story.

 

The opportunity to be involved with Feats of Modest Valour (FOMV) was a gradual one. It was towards the end of my PhD when my supervisor, Dr. Eilis Dowd was awarded a grant as part of an EU consortium called Horizon 2020, with a new initiative to cure Parkinson’s disease. One of the remits of being in receipt of this grant was a community outreach programme called Science on Screen, and because of this, the Feats of Modest Valour documentary was born. It was commissioned by the Science Foundation Ireland Centre for Research in Medical Devices (CÚRAM) and the Galway UNESCO City of Film and Galway Film Centre.

Several projects were pitched to film makers to connect with the general public, and as a result of our pitch which revolved around the gene-environment interaction and increased susceptibility in Parkinson’s disease, ISHKA Films (Alice McDowell and Mia Mullarkey) production company decided to focus on our work. As part of the Horizon 2020 grant, the brain mattrain project is focussing on the development of a new biomedical device for Parkinson’s disease which will, for the first time, target the underlying cause of Parkinson’s disease rather than purely addressing the motor symptoms.

One of the most appealing aspects of the project was the platform for engaging with the general public. There is so much fascinating research being performed for a host of diseases all over Ireland but yet there sometimes seems to be a disconnect between that and the very people who the research will have the most impact on.

This was something we were very interested in when we hosted a conference in Galway in 2014. For the NECTAR (Network for European CNS Transplantation and Restoration) conference, which brings together a unique audience of clinicians and scientists from all over the world to disseminate their research and results of clinical trials. We wanted to do something different, to broaden the scope of the conference, so we integrated a patient-oriented focus into the programme.  The founder of Cure Parkinson’s UK, Tom Isaacs (1968-2017), who was diagnosed with the disease when he was only 27, attended the event and spoke passionately about trying to bridge the gap between clinicians, scientists and patients.  Being part of FOMV gave us the opportunity to do this, to merge science and real life.

It helped therefore that I had been spending quite a lot of time with Brian and with people from the Parkinson’s Association of Ireland.  It has several branches all over the country so I spent quite a lot of time talking with them, organising charity walks, hosting information days and securing funding for speech and language therapists for them. Considering the wealth of knowledge that you can acquire throughout the course of a PhD, it is really rewarding being able to give something back.

When I look back, easily the best part about FOMV was spending time with people with Parkinson’s disease. It is quite easy to forget the bigger picture, the reason why you set out to do research in the first place. This was an opportunity for me to interact with people who were suffering with Parkinson’s disease and talk with them and explain to them about our research. The platform for relaying scientific research to the general public is definitely an under-utilised one. For the majority of research, people do not know what is going on. When the tailor for the documentary was first shown to people, the most common response you heard back was: “I can’t believe this is happening on our backdoor,” or “That was so easy to follow and to understand,” or “Why don’t more scientists do this to explain their research to us?”

Our documentary was recently submitted to a film festival in New York called the Imagine Science Films (ISF) festival, in collaboration with the American Association for the Advancement of Science (AAAS). The select jury included Nobel prize-winning scientist Professor Martin Chalfe, and award-winning science columnist for the New York Times, Professor Carl Zimmer.

We were absolutely delighted when FOMV won The Scientist Award, which is awarded to a film that portrays, accurately and importantly inventively, the life of a scientist. The goal of this award is to encourage more scientists to create films that let people into their minds, into their labs and into their lifestyle. In addition to the top science award, FOMV was also awarded runner up People’s Choice Award. This award is presented to the documentary that receives the most audience votes during the festival.

Being part of Feats of Modest Valour was definitely one of the most humbling experiences I have ever had. I have met so many people who suffer with Parkinson’s disease and in the face of such a relentless disease, they have such incredible resolve to make the most of their lives. We tend to take so much for granted and forget to appreciate the little things. And while that sounds very clichéd, Milena, Brian and Tom are no longer in a position to do that. They live a completely clockwork existence based around the particular time when they take their medication. And even then, their days are more bad than good.

That’s why the title of the documentary ‘Feats of Modest Valour’ is based on a poem called ‘No signs of struggle,’ by an American poet named Robin Morgan, who was diagnosed with Parkinson’s disease;

“You can spot it in the provocation of a button, an arm poking at a sleeve, a balancing act at a night-time curb while negotiating the dark. Feats of such modest valour, who would suspect them to be exercises in an intimate, fierce discipline, a metaphysics of being relentlessly aware.”

 

Make sure to tune in to RTE One on Sunday 12th of November, when ‘Feats of Modest Valour’ is on at 10.35pm.

For more We Are Randox stories about our amazing colleagues, make sure to follow us on Facebook, Instagram and Twitter and follow the hashtag #WeAreRandox.

For current vacancies in our team, visit careers.randox.com

 


Clinical Laboratory Survey