Diagnostics leader delivers new fertility service for UK

Diagnostics leader delivers new fertility service for UK

  • UK-based diagnostics firm supporting call for responsible use of antibiotics in conjunction with European and International Antibiotics Awareness initiatives
  • New molecular diagnostic multiplex assays hold the key to first-time, accurate diagnosis of infectious diseases
  • Assays have the power to diagnose primary, secondary and asymptomatic co-infections to inform appropriate antibiotic prescribing

UK-based diagnostics company, Randox Laboratories, is supporting the call for patients and prescribers to ‘resist and desist’ antibiotic use in the fight against antimicrobial resistance this European Antibiotics Awareness Day. Coinciding with international awareness weeks in Australia, Canada and the USA, the concerted efforts of health authorities around the world to curb the spread of antimicrobial resistance is testimony to the global reach of the issue.

Now declared a ‘major threat’ by the World Health Organisation, Randox has been working at the forefront of this global challenge to deliver effective diagnostic solutions to arm against this growing problem. Developed over two decades of research and an investment of £200m, Randox’s innovative Biochip Array Technology (BAT) is the latest weapon in the fight against antimicrobial resistance, with the ability to simultaneously detect multiple pathogens in a single test for rapid and accurate diagnosis.

Randox’s range of molecular assays within infectious disease enable the detection of primary, secondary and asymptomatic co-infections for a more comprehensive understanding of the drivers of infection in individual patients. The Randox STI Multiplex Array simultaneously detects up to 10 pathogens from a single patient sample, whilst the Randox Respiratory Multiplex Array rapidly screens for 22 bacterial and viral upper and lower respiratory tract infections, with same day result reporting, for rapid diagnosis.

As Randox Managing Director Dr Peter FitzGerald CBE FREng explains, screening for all potential pathogens in infectious disease is vital in ensuring accurate diagnoses can be made; “Even after a confirmed diagnosis, many patients who haven’t been tested for a wider range of pathogens may harbour co-infections, impeding the effectiveness of therapeutic treatment and prolonging exposure to infection.

“Through a more comprehensive screening strategy at initial presentation, a complete patient profile can be obtained which will give clinicians greater understanding of the working of the disease and allow them to diagnose and prescribe correctly, ruling in or out the need for antibiotics, and helping to control their appropriate use.”

Antibiotic resistance has largely been fuelled by patient and prescriber overreliance on using antibiotics to treat disease. Once considered to be ‘magic bullets’ for curing infections, antibiotics are now firing blanks as they become ineffective against many common and treatable infectious diseases, such as the sexually transmitted infection, Neisseria gonorrhoeae, and respiratory tract infections such as staphylococcus aureus and streptococcus pneumoniae, which have been shown to be acquiring increasing levels of resistance to antibiotic treatment.

“First-time, accurate diagnosis of infection through molecular testing is key to treating infections correctly. The availability of these assays provides a powerful weapon in the fight against antimicrobial resistance and we would encourage health providers around the world to utilise this technology to help curb the spread of the problem.”

For more information visit Randox: dev.randox.com.


Randox calls for patients and prescribers to ‘resist and desist’ antibiotic use

  • UK-based diagnostics firm supporting call for responsible use of antibiotics in conjunction with European and International Antibiotics Awareness initiatives
  • New molecular diagnostic multiplex assays hold the key to first-time, accurate diagnosis of infectious diseases
  • Assays have the power to diagnose primary, secondary and asymptomatic co-infections to inform appropriate antibiotic prescribing

UK-based diagnostics company, Randox Laboratories, is supporting the call for patients and prescribers to ‘resist and desist’ antibiotic use in the fight against antimicrobial resistance this European Antibiotics Awareness Day. Coinciding with international awareness weeks in Australia, Canada and the USA, the concerted efforts of health authorities around the world to curb the spread of antimicrobial resistance is testimony to the global reach of the issue.

Now declared a ‘major threat’ by the World Health Organisation, Randox has been working at the forefront of this global challenge to deliver effective diagnostic solutions to arm against this growing problem. Developed over two decades of research and an investment of £200m, Randox’s innovative Biochip Array Technology (BAT) is the latest weapon in the fight against antimicrobial resistance, with the ability to simultaneously detect multiple pathogens in a single test for rapid and accurate diagnosis.

Randox’s range of molecular assays within infectious disease enable the detection of primary, secondary and asymptomatic co-infections for a more comprehensive understanding of the drivers of infection in individual patients. The Randox STI Multiplex Array simultaneously detects up to 10 pathogens from a single patient sample, whilst the Randox Respiratory Multiplex Array rapidly screens for 22 bacterial and viral upper and lower respiratory tract infections, with same day result reporting, for rapid diagnosis.

As Randox Managing Director Dr Peter FitzGerald CBE FREng explains, screening for all potential pathogens in infectious disease is vital in ensuring accurate diagnoses can be made; “Even after a confirmed diagnosis, many patients who haven’t been tested for a wider range of pathogens may harbour co-infections, impeding the effectiveness of therapeutic treatment and prolonging exposure to infection.

“Through a more comprehensive screening strategy at initial presentation, a complete patient profile can be obtained which will give clinicians greater understanding of the working of the disease and allow them to diagnose and prescribe correctly, ruling in or out the need for antibiotics, and helping to control their appropriate use.”

Antibiotic resistance has largely been fuelled by patient and prescriber overreliance on using antibiotics to treat disease. Once considered to be ‘magic bullets’ for curing infections, antibiotics are now firing blanks as they become ineffective against many common and treatable infectious diseases, such as the sexually transmitted infection, Neisseria gonorrhoeae, and respiratory tract infections such as staphylococcus aureus and streptococcus pneumoniae, which have been shown to be acquiring increasing levels of resistance to antibiotic treatment.

“First-time, accurate diagnosis of infection through molecular testing is key to treating infections correctly. The availability of these assays provides a powerful weapon in the fight against antimicrobial resistance and we would encourage health providers around the world to utilise this technology to help curb the spread of the problem.”

For more information visit Randox: dev.randox.com.


Randox launches Data Management ‘Advisor’ to optimise lab quality control

Global clinical diagnostics firm Randox Laboratories has launched a new ‘Advisor’ application to complement its interlaboratory data management software Acusera 24•7 Live Online.

Acusera Advisor is an optional tool designed to help laboratories select an optimum QC strategy for each individual test in use. It will recommend and automatically apply QC multi-rules per parameter, as well as advising how frequently a laboratory should run IQC.

By automatically recommending optimised QC multi-rules, this lowers the Probability for False Rejection (Pfr) whilst maintaining high Probability for Error Detection (Ped). It helps labs reduce time spent troubleshooting anomalies, helping avoid unnecessary and costly QC repeats without affecting error detection.

Based on the performance limits selected by the customer Acusera Advisor will calculate the laboratory’s allowable imprecision (%CV) and allowable inaccuracy (%bias). These figures are then plotted on an Operating Specifications Chat (OPSpecs Chart) against the line equations for each strategy and from this the optimal QC multi-rules and frequency are selected.

The QC multi-rules and frequency are recommended based on the level of quality that the laboratory wishes to achieve. Before any recommendations can be made for any particular method, users must enter a minimum of 20 results for at least two levels of controls and set user defined performance limits.

A web-based system, Acusera 24•7 offers an easy-to-use and intuitive interface, direct connectivity to the laboratory’s LIS and the ability to produce fully interactive charts and comprehensive reports to meet individual laboratory requirements. Peer group data is updated every 24 hours, giving laboratories access to the most up to date information available. Statistics for Acusera 24•7 are generated from a peer data group of over 28,000 laboratory participants, the largest available in the market. This ensures a large database of results and analytical methods, therefore increasing statistical validity.

For more information visit www.randoxqc.com.


IL-6 and IL-18 Important in Rapid Cycling Bipolar Disorder

Rapid cycling bipolar disorder is identified as when a person experiences four or more distinct episodes of either mania or depression within a one year time period. Although not hugely common, it is estimated that 1 in every 100 people suffers with the disorder.

Previous studies have identified a link between immune dysregulation and cytokine levels within the condition; however these were based upon case control studies which were limited by methodological difficulties. New research published in October’s edition of ‘Brain, Behavior and Immunity’ (1) sought to identify varying cytokine levels when a person is in a state of rapid cycling bipolar disorder when compared to healthy control subjects.

Plasma samples were taken from 37 patients with rapid cycling bipolar disorder and measured for IL 6, IL 10, IL 18, IL 1b and TNFa and compared to 40 healthy aged and gender matched control patients in a 6-12 month longitudinally designed study. Adjustments were made for demographic, clinical and lifestyle factors.

When comparing manic and depressive states, investigators reported that levels of IL 6 (p<0.05) and IL 18 (p<0.05) were significantly elevated when the patient was experiencing a manic or hypomanic state. It was also found that when compared to healthy subjects, unadjusted levels of IL 6 (p<0.05) and IL 18(p<0.05) were elevated in manic/hypomanic bipolar disorder patients.

Researchers disclosed that levels of IL 10 and IL 1b were undetectable in the majority of samples, as well as finding high TNFa assay variability.

These results show clinical significance as they support the role of the immune response in rapid cycling bipolar and suggest that IL 6 and IL 18 could be markers of manic episodes meaning that a person with suspected bipolar can be more quickly diagnosed.

References:

1. Brain, Behavior and Immunity http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0889159114004772

If you are interested in researching the effects that various cytokines have on the body, Randox Research offers numerous high quality multiplex cytokines arrays; allowing for a comprehensive panel of 35 cytokines, chemokines, cytokine receptors and growth factors, over five multi-analyte arrays to be simultaneously measured. Alternatively custom arrays can be created, allowing researchers to custom choose from over 180 immunology focused biomarkers. For more information, download our Immunology Research brochure or email: research@randox.com.


Clinical Laboratory Survey